How to adjust to wearing glasses with prisms

Updated May 10, 2017

It takes some time to adjust to a new eyeglass prescription, especially a new prescription with prisms. Your ophthalmologist might prescribe glasses with prisms if your eyes do not track or align properly. When you first receive your new glasses, you may experience a feeling of eyestrain, headaches and, in some cases, nausea and dizziness. It is important to give yourself adequate time to adjust to wearing glasses with prisms.

Give it time. It can take up to two weeks to fully adjust to a new eyeglass prescription. If you've never worn glasses before or if you've never worn glasses with prisms, expect that it will take that long to adjust. Patients who have worn prism eyeglasses before and simply have a stronger prescription can expect that the adjustment period will be shorter.

Avoid activities that make your symptoms worse or that can put you in danger. If you are having trouble with depth perception or dizziness, for example, do not drive and avoid sudden head movements.

Wear your glasses as much as possible. You need to spend a lot of time letting your eyes get used to the new prescription, and the best way to do this is to wear your glasses all day, if possible. Do not switch between your new prescription and your old prescription, as this will only make your symptoms worse.

Call your opthalmologist or optometrist if your symptoms get worse, if they do not improve as time goes by or if two weeks go by and you are not fully adjusted. Your eye doctor may need to see you to evaluate whether your prescription should be changed.


Call your eye doctor at any time if you are worried about your symptoms or if they seem especially severe.

bibliography-icon icon for annotation tool Cite this Article

About the Author

Michelle Kulas worked in the health-care field for 10 years, serving as a certified nurses' assistant, dental assistant and dental insurance billing coordinator. Her areas of expertise include health and dental topics, parenting, nutrition, homeschooling and travel.