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Easy to Make Native American Jewelry Crafts

Updated April 17, 2017

Native American jewellery can be more than a style statement. With a rich history behind the traditional designs and materials used in Native American jewellery, creating your own items will help you to learn more about the Native American cultures. Whether you prefer beaded jewellery or items featuring silver and turquoise, you're sure to find a jewellery craft to suit your style and your budget.

Dream Catcher Jewelry

Make dream catchers using wire and feathers in a variety of sizes. Form a circle from a thick gauge (10 or 12 is good) wire and weave a thinner wire, such as a 28-gauge, in a spiderweb pattern around the circle. Hang a few feathers from the bottom to complete the dream catcher. Make two small dream catchers and attach to earring wires; larger ones make attractive necklaces when strung on a leather cord or a long chain.

Turquoise and Silver

Turquoise and silver are commonly used in Native American jewellery crafts. You can get this look at home by purchasing beads (natural or synthetic) at speciality stores and stringing them on elastic thread to make chunky bracelets. Use large beads for a fashion statement, or smaller ones for a more subdued look. Tie off the elastic thread tightly so that it won't come loose when the bracelet is stretched over a wrist.

Beaded Designs

Native American beading techniques include weaving and embroidery. Use a bead loom to create bracelets and necklaces using seed beads; a beading needle, fabric and an embroidery hoop can be used together with seed beads to make elegant embroidered bib necklaces.

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About the Author

Christine Meyer has been writing professionally since 1995. Holding a Bachelor of Arts in music from Taylor University, a CELTA from the University of Cambridge ESOL, and a CBA in marketing from IBMEC Rio de Janeiro, Meyer has experience in a variety of fields. Her articles have been published in newspapers and on sites such as eHow.com.