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How to Make a Concrete Firepit

Updated February 21, 2017

There is nothing like a fire on a cool night to sit around and tell stories and roast marshmallows. A permanent fire pit made out of concrete is a perfect addition to a back yard, because it can act as a centre piece for landscaping, as well as a focal point of family (and friendly) activity. Although it takes some strength and patience to construct, it's not complicated so a reasonably strong and handy do it yourself should be able to finish this job within a day or two.

Choose a location for your fire pit away from any brush, overhanging trees or structures that may catch fire.

Lay out a ring of the concrete wall stones in the position you want the fire pit to sit.

Mark the location of the pit by digging a ring about an inch outside the perimeter of the blocks.

Take note of how many blocks are in the complete circle, then remove them from the circle.

Dig a trench with the outside edge at the circle you marked with the shovel. Make it 12 inches deep, and as wide as the stones are. Dig in the centre of the pit, within the trench, six inches deep.

Fill the trench with three-quarter inch drainage gravel, even with the surface of the middle area of the pit, which is six inches below grade. Compact the gravel with a tamper.

Lay the circle of wall blocks you set aside before onto the gravel circle, and level them.

Spread concrete glue between two of the blocks, and lay a third block on top of them, centred on the seam. Continue doing this until the second layer of blocks is complete.

Fill the pit with more gravel, even with the top of the second layer. This will help support the blocks as you continue to build.

Lay the third and fourth layers of wall stone like you did in Step 8, using the concrete glue and staggering the blocks.

Wait two days before starting a fire.

Warning

Work quickly and in small sections with the concrete glue, because it dries fast.

Things You'll Need

  • Concrete glue
  • Concrete wall blocks
  • Gravel
  • Shovel
  • Trowel
  • Tamper
  • Level
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About the Author

L.P. Klages is an entrepreneur and software developer, concentrating on information theory, software user experience, and mathematical modeling. He has been writing about technology and the business of technology since 1999. His articles have appeared on many sites, including GameDev.net, KenSharpe.net, and eHow. Klages attended Jacksonville University in Jacksonville, Fla.