How to make an ancient celtic robe

Written by alyson paige | 13/05/2017
How to make an ancient celtic robe
(http://www.museumwales.ac.uk/en/rhagor/article/1937/, http://www.neopagan.net/DruidSymbols.html, http://www.ivymoon.co.uk/products/images/cloaks/treeoflife.jpg, http://www.aniam.co.uk/images/cloaks/robes.jpg, http://www.panpipes.com/robedruidlrg.jpg)

Celtic robes were worn by followers of the goddess religions in ancient Wales and the British Isles. Druid priests still wear the long, hooded white robes that designate their order to Stonehenge Summer Solstice celebrations. Celtic robes that echo ancient times are simple to make.

How to make an ancient celtic robe

Select a white robe, or one in a natural, organic shade. Ancient Celtic robes reflect personal qualities and are central to Druid identity. Consider the weight and texture of the fabric as well as how it fits---Druid priests considered the robes to be their skin.

How to make an ancient celtic robe

Add fabric trim that contrasts with the robe or is associated with your favourite god or goddess. Sew the trim from the front bottom edge of the robe, up along the lapel, around the neck and down the opposite lapel to the bottom of the robe.

How to make an ancient celtic robe

For a man, embroider or draw a green pentacle on the right sleeve or cuff. Pentacles display the degree of your Druid knowledge and become increasingly ornate with advanced knowledge.

How to make an ancient celtic robe

Add a cord in a colour that matches or contrasts with the robe. In ancient times, Druid priests used a rolled cord, called Gwyddon Cord, to measure temples. This cord, used as a belt, is 9 feet long and has 5 knots. Each end is knotted, with a knot precisely in the middle and a knot exactly between each end and the middle knot.

Things you need

  • White hooded robe (plain)
  • Contrasting trim
  • 9 foot cording
  • Green fabric paint or embroidery thread

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