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How to remove semi-permanent hair dye

Updated April 17, 2017

Removing semi-permanent hair dye is much easier when done immediately after the hair is dyed. Multiple washes is usually enough to remove the dye if done before 24 hours have passed. There are also a few home treatments that can assist in removing the semi-permanent hair dye if it has been more than 24 hours.

Wash your hair with hot water immediately. If it's been less than 24 hours since you've dyed your hair, wash it several times with hot water and shampoo or soap. The hot water will remove most of the hair dye if you wash your hair right after dyeing.

Apply a hot oil treatment on your hair. Follow the instructions carefully to make sure you apply the treatment correctly. The deep conditioning provided by the treatment helps to remove semi-permanent hair dye.

Coat hair with lemon juice and let it stand for 10 minutes. Squeeze the juice from a fresh lemon and pour it all over your hair. Cover your hair with a shower cap and rinse it clean after 10 minutes. The citric acid in lemon juice is a natural hair lightener that will assist in removing the hair dye.

Coat hair with white vinegar and let it stand for 20 minutes. Apply a generous amount of white vinegar all over your hair and cover with a shower cap. After 20 minutes, rinse clean. The acidity in the vinegar will help remove the semi-permanent hair dye.

Apply hot virgin olive oil. Heat the oil in a saucepan. Allow to cool slightly before use. Coat your entire hair with the hot virgin olive oil and allow to sit for at least a half-hour. Rinse clean. Similar to the hot oil treatments mentioned in Step 2, this treatment will also remove the semi-permanent hair dye.

Tip

Use a comb after applying any of these treatments to coat every strand thoroughly.

Warning

Be careful not to burn yourself when applying the hot virgin olive oil treatment. Test the oil carefully with your finger before you apply it to your hair.

Things You'll Need

  • Hot oil treatment
  • Lemon juice
  • White vinegar
  • Shower cap
  • Virgin olive oil
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About the Author

Maggie Hira has been writing professionally since 2006. She has written for numerous websites and print publications, including "LA.Direct Magazine" and The Budget Fashionista. Hira holds a Bachelor of Arts in English from the University of California, Los Angeles.