How to Train Clematis Up a Pole

Written by suzie faloon
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How to Train Clematis Up a Pole
Clematis vines should be planted in a permanent location. (Photos.com/Photos.com/Getty Images)

The clematis plant is a vigorous climber that can live for decades. You can train a clematis to climb up a pole, but it must be outfitted with extra support for the vining plant to remain secure as it becomes heavier. The shallow root system will be aided by a support that will take stress from the base of the vine. The individual branches of the plant must have something for the petiole vining leaves to grasp onto while growing.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Things you need

  • Chicken wire
  • Wire cutters
  • Nails
  • Hammer
  • Staple gun

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Wrap chicken wire around the circumference of the pole.

  2. 2

    Hammer nails into the pole to firmly secure the chicken wire to the wood. You can also use a staple gun to secure portions of the wire to the pole. The entire piece of wire should not fit snugly against the pole. It is all right for the wire to be doubled, almost forming pockets, in areas to give space for the petioles and tendrils to entwine with the wires.

  3. 3

    Plant the clematis vine 18 to 24 inches from the base of the pole. If the vine is already established in the ground, set the pole in no closer than 18 inches from the plant.

  4. 4

    Gently secure a piece of the vine to the chicken wire by loosely tying it with a piece of yarn or soft twine at the base of the pole.

  5. 5

    Secure the vine to the wire as it grows taller. Remove the yarn or twine when the plant has fully secured itself to the wire.

Tips and warnings

  • Do not wrap the chicken wire as a skin over the pole or the plant will not have enough room to flourish.

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