How to make a board game spinner at home

Written by nannette richford Google
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Kids are notorious for losing pieces to games, and the game spinner is no exception. Without it, it's impossible to play the game, and buying one may not fit the needs of your particular game. Making a replacement spinner is easier than you may think.

Skill level:

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Things you need

  • Lightweight cardboard
  • Card stock paper
  • Brass paper fastener
  • Permanent markers
  • Paper punch
  • Clear contact paper/laminator

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  1. 1

    Determine what information needs to be on the spinner. For simple games, several coloured sections may be enough. For other games, numbers, images, or specific wording may be required. Read the rules of the game carefully to be sure you include all necessary information on the spinner.

  2. 2

    Cut a 6-by-6 inch square of lightweight cardboard or card stock paper. At least one side of this square must be blank in order to create a spinner.

  3. 3

    Trace a circle onto the card. Use a compass or trace around an appropriately sized lid to create a circle that is at least 5 inches across. Locate the centre of the circle and draw a heavy black dot in the centre.

  4. 4

    Determine the number of sections you will need on the spinner, and draw lines to connect outer edges by running it through the centre dot. Draw as many lines as necessary to create the appropriate number of sections. To mark even spaces, begin by dividing the circle in half. Then divide each section in half again to create fourths, and so forth until you have the correct number of sections.

  5. 5

    Sketch the information needed in each section with a pencil. Add any visual details or pencil in any words that are required. Colour in any sections that require colour with a permanent marker. Trace over the pencilled designs or words with a permanent marker that is easy to read (usually black).

  6. 6

    Cut an arrow from card stock that is slightly shorter than the circumference of the circle. Be sure you have chosen a colour that will be visible against any section of the spinner. Shape one end into a point. Cover the spinner and the arrow with clear contact paper or laminate to increase durability and prevent damage from routine game play.

  7. 7

    Punch a hole through the centre of the spinner with a paper punch. Locate the centre of the arrow, and punch the hole. Insert a paper fastener through the hole of the arrow, and thread through the hole in the spinner. Turn the spinner over and tighten the clasp. Check to make sure the arrow spins freely.

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