How to become a train conductor

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A train conductor is responsible for many aspects of a train's operation. He not only collects tickets, but supervises maids and porters and works closely with the engineer to revise railway schedules when needed. He is the main contact between the public and the railway. Read on to learn how to become a train conductor.

Skill level:
Moderate

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Instructions

  1. 1

    Get a high school diploma. You must have a good foundation in the basics if you want to become a train conductor. Both written and verbal communication skills are necessary. You must be able to read and comprehend information quickly. A train conductor analyzes ticket information and makes quick decisions concerning routes and schedules.

  2. 2

    Develop a resume that shows you are a people person. If you want to become a train conductor, you must handle difficult situations well. You must handle complaints by passengers and settle disputes. Even experience working in the fast food industry will look good on your resume. It exhibits training in public relations and organization, both of which are valuable skills.

  3. 3

    Acquire some experience in railroad work. Get a job as a rail yard worker if you want to become a train conductor. Most often, a train conductor started his career at the bottom of the railway totem pole.

  4. 4

    Find a school that teaches railroad operations. Some colleges offer a two-year degree in railroad operations. Many technical schools have a certificate program that requires less time. There are also railroad education and development schools that specifically train both passenger and freight conductors. If you want to become a train conductor, you may be able to complete the course in 23 weeks. This includes both classroom instruction and on-the-job training.

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