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How to dissolve dog poo

Dog mess on the street or in the park is smelly, inconvenient and unpleasant to see and tread in. Dog poo that builds up in your garden can cause problems for your family. Dog poo may also carry diseases like toxicariasis which can be dangerous for humans and other dogs. Dog owners have the responsibility under the Dogs (Fouling of Land) Act 1996 and the Environmental Protection Act 1990 to clean up dog mess from public land and to prevent dog poo building up in a private garden. But dog poo thrown in the bin ends up on the landfill site. Dissolving dog poo is a more environmentally friendly option.

Buy a dog toilet for the garden

Buy a ready-made dog loo from a pet shop on online. For example, the Clean Green Dog Loo by Good Boy locks away pet waste in a plastic bucket and comes with a scoop for adding the waste and a child-resistant security fastener.

Sink the dog toilet into the ground. Place large stones beneath the toilet to give good drainage. Follow the instructions carefully to correctly install the toilet and avoid ending up with persistent waste in the bucket.

Use a bio-activator in the toilet. Pet Poo Magic is a plant-based bio-activator; alternatively, many dog toilets come with a supply of bio-activator. Flush the waste with water and the poo will dissolve into the ground.

Make your own dog poo composter

Drill holes in the sides of a large plastic bin or bucket. Cut out the base of the bin. The size of the bin depends on how much space you have in your garden and how many dogs you have.

Dig a hole slightly deeper than the bin. Find a location away from food plants. Fill the base of the hole with small rocks or gravel. Place the bin in the hole and install a child-proof lid on top.

Drop dog poo into the bin. Add a bio-activator, septic tank starter or Pet Poo Magic and a little water. The dog waste slowly dissolves and the liquid flows into the soil.

Warning

Experts don’t recommend putting dog poo on your compost heap. Dog and cat waste may carry pathogens that are not destroyed before the waste is dissolved into compost and the dissolving process can be smelly.

Don’t use any compost from the dog toilet on plants that are intended for food use.

Things You'll Need

  • Ready-made dog toilet
  • Bio-activator
  • Plastic bin
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About the Author

Louise Carr has been writing and editing for consumer and business media since 2000. She covers health, travel, literature and current affairs, including for LIVESTRONG.COM and other online publications. Carr holds an honors Bachelor of Arts in American and English studies from Nottingham University, England.