How a Fluorescent Light Diffuser Works

Written by neal litherland
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Fluorescent lights are cheap, functional, and extremely energy efficient. These lamps produce light through a unique chemical process. The long, glass tubes are filled with gas and the inside receives a chemical coating. When electricity is run through the gas in the tube, the gas releases electrons. As these electrons strike the chemical coating on the inside of the lamp, it causes the coating to glow brightly and give off visible light. Though extremely efficient, fluorescent lighting can also be harsh, and many people complain that exposure to the light for long periods causes headaches.

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Fluorescent Light Diffuser

As the name might suggest, a fluorescent light diffuser is meant to break up the harshness of the light caused by fluorescent lamps. A light diffuser is a simple, plastic sheet that acts just like any other fluorsecent light cover. However the diffuser has artwork, shapes, or simply a design of a blue sky on it. The added colour and designs soften the light from the fluorescent lamp and help to spread it in a wider pattern. The simple tints and designs in a fluorescent light diffuser soften the glare from the lamps, and spread the brightness around so that the light is more gentle and natural looking.

Added Benefits

The first and most obvious benefit is that the fluorescent light is softened and the glare is reduced. This makes the light easier on the eyes and it reduces headaches and tension. Fluorescent light diffusers also create ambience, and they can lend a cheerful touch to an otherwise dull or drab environment. These light covers are also simple to install, and the panels are relatively inexpensive. Whether it's a school, an office, or even a dentist's work space, fluorescent light diffusers can be a great asset for both the look and feel of a place.

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