Can You Use Plastic Sheeting As a Shingle Underlay?

Written by bobby parker
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
Can You Use Plastic Sheeting As a Shingle Underlay?
(Construction Worker on the Roof image by steverts from Fotolia.com)

When replacing your roof one of the first decisions you have to make is what type underlayment is right for you. Of several choices, high quality professional plastic sheeting is one of the best options for the job.

Other People Are Reading

Advantages

Using plastic underlay offers several advantages to the builder. The first and perhaps, most attractive, is that it is virtually waterproof and wicks away moisture more efficiently than other materials. The second major advantage to using a plastic underlay is its durability. Since it is composed of interlocking polymers it outlasts typical tar paper, according to David Toht in his book, "Smart Guide: Roofing: Step-by-Step Projects."

Can You Use Plastic Sheeting As a Shingle Underlay?
(new house roofing image by Gale Distler from Fotolia.com)

Disadvantages

Two drawbacks might discourage one using plastic underlay. The first is cost. A high-quality plastic underlay designed specifically for roofs often costs 60 per cent more than tar felt, notes Daniel Atcheson, in his book "Roofing Construction and Estimating." The second disadvantage is plastic underlay's relative inflexibility. Because of this, it is more prone to tearing during installation or an intense wind storm.

Can You Use Plastic Sheeting As a Shingle Underlay?
(tapete image by Rolf Klebsattel from Fotolia.com)

Alternatives

Many people who decide against plastic underlayment for their roofs choose organic felt instead. Organic felt offers the builder more flexibility as well as a substantial savings in cost.

Can You Use Plastic Sheeting As a Shingle Underlay?
(house under construction image by Jana Lumley from Fotolia.com)

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.