Does a New Car Get Better Mileage After Driving It Awhile?

Written by jill jensen
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
Does a New Car Get Better Mileage After Driving It Awhile?
The first few thousand miles matter. (ROAD image by Nisakorn Neera from Fotolia.com)

U.S. Department of Energy guidelines state that it takes between 3,000 to 5,000 miles of driving to break in a new engine and reach the optimal fuel economy.

Other People Are Reading

Car Manufacturing Impacts Mileage

The slightest variation in assembling a new car can impact the estimated fuel mileage and a few drivers will notice a marked deviation from EPA estimates.

Does a New Car Get Better Mileage After Driving It Awhile?
Manufaturing can alter mileage (Luxury Car sportscar from my luxury car series image by alma_sacra from Fotolia.com)

Changing New Car Fuel Lables

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Department of Transportation are proposing different fuel economy labels for new cars. One suggested label uses a letter grade with an A+ going to electric vehicles. The other suggested label uses horizontal bars to compare mileage to other cars, the environmental impact of carbon emissions and a slider bar to depict cost of fuel rather than fuel savings.

Does a New Car Get Better Mileage After Driving It Awhile?
Fuel economy labels are changing (Just fill it up. image by Saskia Massink from Fotolia.com)

Maintance Retains Fuel Estimates

The EPA determines fuel economy using cars with 5,000 miles to allow for the break-in period. The EPA says fuel economy typically improves in the first few years of ownership and will retain it's optimum gas mileage if properly maintained.

Does a New Car Get Better Mileage After Driving It Awhile?
Fuel economy improves during first few years of ownership (new york city west side highway traffic image by Jorge Moro from Fotolia.com)

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.