What Is the Difference Between an Oakley Flak Jacket & a Half Jacket?

Written by maureen kelly
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What Is the Difference Between an Oakley Flak Jacket & a Half Jacket?
These sunglasses are designed for outdoor athletics. (Jogging image by UFO73370 from Fotolia.com)

Oakley is a sporting goods manufacturer best known for its line of high-end sunglasses. Oakley offers the Half Jacket and the Flak Jacket sunglasses, which are similar but have distinguishing features.

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Designed for outdoor athletics, both sets of glasses feature trademarked Oakley elements, such as frames made from "O Matter," a lightweight synthetic material. The nosepieces and stem sleeves are made of "Unobtainium," another synthetic material designed to prevent slippage when wet. Both sets come with interchangeable lenses of varying tints and choice of the same two lens shapes (standard and XLJ). Oakley's "High Definition Optics" lens structure is standard with both.

The Flak Jacket Features

The Flak Jacket lenses have a special coating, called "Hydrophobic," designed to prevent streaks and water accumulation. The surface is supposed to remain free of haze when surface residue, such as from fingerprints and sunscreen, is wiped off. This coating is anti-static to repel dust. In regard to the interchangeable lenses both pairs sport, Trails.com notes that "While some people found the Flak Jacket XLJ lenses easier to change than the Half Jackets, it's all really a matter of getting used to changing lenses."

The Half Jacket Features

Unlike Flak Jacket, the Half Jacket is available with prescription lenses. It does not come with the Hydrophobic coating. Outside Magazine notes in its review of the Half Jacket that "the close fit at the brow makes these racy wraps a delight for bikies."

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