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What is the definition for a natural habitat & a man made habitat?

Updated July 19, 2017

Habitats occur in nature, but may also be designed and fabricated by man. Both types of habitats serve as an environment in which a species can live and thrive.

Definition

The word habitat is derived from the Greek word meaning home. A habitat is the natural environment, or physical environment in which a species lives.

Natural Habitat

The term natural habitat refers to an environment occurring naturally in forests, wetlands, deserts, grasslands and the Arctic tundra, which supports a particular species through a natural provision of water, shelter, an area conducive to birthing, and food.

Man-made Habitat

A man-made habitat refers to an environment manufactured or created by human beings, which contains the elements, sometimes synthetic, which would otherwise be found in a natural habitat, and are necessary to support a species.

Differences

A natural habitat is formed organically, within a natural environment, without assistance from man. Man-made habitats have been manipulated by people, in an effort to mimic a natural habitat. A zoo is a good example of a man-made habitat.

Similarities

Both types of habitats include the vital elements to support a species, which are shelter, an area conducive to birthing, water and food.

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About the Author

Lisa Larsen has been a professional writer for over 18 years. She has written radio advertisement copy, research papers, SEO articles, magazine articles for "BIKE," "USA Today" and "Dirt Rag," newspaper articles for "Florida Today" and short stories published in "Glimmer Train" and "Lullwater Review," among others. She has a master's degree in education and is a member of the National Society of Collegiate Scholars.