Dyspraxia & Writing

Updated April 17, 2017

Dyspraxia is associated with poor hand-eye coordination, so difficulty with the mechanics of handwriting is common. Someone with dyspraxia is also likely to have problems with language and thought, so it could be a challenge to develop a considered, logical piece of writing.


Someone with dyspraxia might hold a pen awkwardly or in a way that is not deemed correct or might be unable to write in a straight line. It is also common for someone to apply heavy pressure when writing or very light pressure. This could lead to untidy or even illegible handwriting that is impossible to decipher.

Other Problems

Problems with short-term memory and concentration can affect the ability to spell accurately. Schoolchildren with dyspraxia may find it difficult to copy text or to take dictation.


The Dyspraxia Foundation recommends the use of pencil grips and stencils to help children in the classroom. For older children and adults, computers can help with writing, and voice recognition software can also help.

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About the Author

Based on the south coast of the U.K., Sally Nash has been writing since 1988. Her articles have appeared in everything from "Hairdressers Journal" to "Optician." She has also been published in national newspapers such as the "Financial Times." Nash holds a Master of Arts in creative writing from Manchester Metropolitan University.