Specifications for Peavey SP 2XT Speakers

Written by andrew creasey
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The Peavey SP 2XT speaker is generally used as a PA for live bands, public addresses or monitoring systems. It has one 15 inch 1505-8KADT Black Widow speaker that supplies the low end and a 22XT compression driver that handles the high frequencies.

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Sound Quality

The sound quality of a speaker is measured in two units: decibels and watts. Watts are a measure of electrical power. The Peavey speaker can generate 300 watts continually or 600 watts for short periods of time. When you connect an amplifier to these speakers, it is important that the amp does not generate more watts than the Peavey can handle, otherwise it will damage the speaker.

Decibels are a measure of sound loudness. The Peavey speakers have a maximum decibel out of 126, with an average of 101 decibels. 90-95 decibels is the level at which sustained, unprotected exposure can result in hearing damage.


Impedance is measured in ohms, which gauges the amount of electrical current is restricted by the speakers. The Peavey speakers have an impedance of 8 ohms. Ohms are important when deciding how many amplifier to hook into a speaker. If the impedance is breached through to much amplifier power, it will blow out your speaker. It is also important to try to match impedance levels for the amplifiers that will hook into these speakers. The best sound quality results from equal impedance levels.

Frequency Response

Frequency response is the range that a speaker can produce a clear, undistorted sound. The frequency response of the Peavey speaker is 50 hertz to 17.6 kilohertz. The range of human hearing is 20-20,000 hertz. The Peavey comprises a full tonal range, with the exception of a large amount of bass. Subwoofers produce frequencies between 20 and 30 hertz, so if your sound is lacking bass, it is best to add a subwoofer to your sound system.

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