Deputy headteacher job description

Written by adam dawson
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Deputy headteacher job description
A deputy head teacher is the second-highest teaching position in British schools. (woman and a teacher at seminar image by Dmitry Goygel-Sokol from Fotolia.com)

A deputy head teacher is a position held in British elementary and secondary schools. The position is secondary to the role of head teacher, which is the equivalent of a principal in the United States, and is mainly a managerial and administration position.

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Function

A deputy head teacher may take part in some form of teaching, but her main concern is helping the head teacher develop and implement curricular initiatives and monitoring the teaching and learning of the school.

Qualifications

Deputy head teachers need to be qualified teachers. They need a bachelor's degree and a Postgraduate Certificate in Secondary Education (PGCE). Universities across the U.K. provide these programs.

Work Conditions

Teachers have 13 weeks per year in which they don't have to be in the classroom. While the same applies to deputy heads, they might find that during some of this time they still have to come to school to deal with administrative duties. Most working days are 9 a.m. until 4 p.m., although deputy head teachers may have to stay longer.

Leadership Qualities

As a deputy head teacher, a person must possess good leadership qualities. The role involves supporting the head teacher in creating morale and confidence among the teaching staff and setting a good example of overall professionalism.

Salary

According to My Salary, the average salary of deputy heads in the U.K. in 2009 was 23016 Kilogram a year. In the U.S., vice principals with more than 20 years of experience can expect to take home around £46,800 a year, according to Education Portal.

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