Animal Behaviorist Salary

Written by faith davies
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Animal behaviourists or scientists are professionals who study the instincts and habits of animals as well as animal nutrition, reproduction, growth and development. The average annual salary of behaviourists varies based upon a number of factors, including work experience and geographic location.

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Overall Average

As of May 2008, animal behaviourists averaged salaries of £40,066, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The lowest paid 10 per cent of scientists averaged salaries of £21,489 or less, while the highest paid 10 per cent averaged £64,337 or more.

Work Experience

With one to four years of experience in the field, the average animal behaviourist annual salary ranged between £25,295 to £32,788, according Payscale.com in January 2010. Those with 10 to 19 years of experience earned an average of £28,742 to £50,880.

Industry

In May 2008, the federal government paid the highest average salaries to animal behaviourists with average rates of £64,337, reports the BLS. Colleges and universities were the largest employers of scientists in the field and paid an average of £37,310.

Geography

Animal behaviourists who lived in Maryland received the highest average salaries at £65,227 as of May 2008 BLS reporting. Other high-paying states for animal scientists were New Jersey, Florida, Missouri and Iowa, where salaries averaged £45,428 to £49,998.

Benefits

Animal behaviourists reported receiving average annual bonuses of £780 to £2,762 as well as an average of two to three weeks of paid vacation per year, according to Payscale.com. Other benefits given to scientists included paid sick leave and holidays, life and disability insurance, 401k retirement plans, a casual dress and atmosphere, tuition reimbursement, and flexible scheduling.

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