What flowers bloom all year?

Written by joyce starr
  • Share
  • Tweet
  • Share
  • Pin
  • Email
Introduction
  • Introduction

    What flowers bloom all year?

    Gardeners desiring year-round colour in their gardens should consider planting flowering evergreens. They do not drop foliage, and some species flower continuously throughout the year. Plants that bloom year-round come in a variety of shapes and sizes with various flower colours. Choices include continuously blooming trees, vines, perennials and shrubs. Consider the environmental tolerances of a particular plant when selecting a planting site for proper growth and flowering.

    Year-round flowering plants are colourful garden additions. (Getty Images)

  • 1 / 4

    Flowering perennials

    Year-round flowering perennials fulfil many needs within a garden. They work well as groundcovers, mixed gardens, container gardens, edging plants or in mass plantings. Many attract hummingbirds and butterflies, making them useful in wildlife gardens. Crinum lilies (Crinum asiaticum) produce large, year-round blooms on tall, 90 cm (3 foot) stalks. Mexican heather (Cuphea hyssopifolia) has small, year-round purple blooms. Beach sunflower (Helianthus debiles) blooms with yellow, daisy-like flowers all year. Plumbago (Plumbago auriculata) fills with small, bluish flowers throughout the entire year. Twin flower (Dyschoriste oblongifolia) produces purplish, trumpet-like flowers year-round.

    Plumbago grows well in containers or in the garden. (plumbago image by nTripp from Fotolia.com)

  • 2 / 4

    Flowering shrubs

    Year-round flowering shrubs add a display of colour to the landscape. Many work well as specimens, grown in containers or used as privacy hedges. They also add height to perennial gardens, and many attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Heights, foliage size and textures are as diverse as the colours and shapes of blooms. Some species, through pruning, are trainable as smallish trees. Hibiscus (Hibiscus spp.) adds a tropical look with its large, year-round flowers in a variety of shades. Ixora (Ixora coccinea) blooms in clusters of yellow or coral flowers. Natal plum (Carissa macrocarpa) blooms all year with clusters of small white flowers. Edible plumlike fruits follow the flowering stage. Weeping lantana (Lantana depressa) produces small bouquets of yellowish-white flowers throughout the year.

    Hibiscus blooms in many colours of year-round flowers. (pink hibiscus image by Earl Robbins from Fotolia.com)

  • 3 / 4

    Trees

    Adding trees that flower all year make a colourful statement in the landscape. They bring height to the area and are a colourful addition to an otherwise bland garden. Year-round flowering tree species range from smallish ones suitable for patios and containers, to those large enough for specimens. Flower colour and sizes are as diverse as foliage size and texture. Many flowering trees attract various birds including hummingbirds and butterflies. Jatropha (Jatropha integerrima) is a smallish tree suitable for containers or a specimen. It blooms all year with clusters of coral red flowers. Black mangrove tolerates salty conditions making it a suitable choice for coastal landscapes. It produces small white flowers all year. Fiddlewood (Citharexylum fruiticosum) is a smallish tree that fills with plumes of tiny white flowers year-round.

  • 4 / 4

    Flowering vines

    Year-round flowering vines work well on arbors, trellis, fences, as well as in containers. As with many flowering plants, some species attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Yellow allamanda (Allamanda cathartica) produces bright yellow, trumpet-shaped blooms all year. Bougainvillea (Bougainvillea cvs.) has many cultivars producing flowers in a variety of colours. The plant grows as a thorny vine or if left unpruned as a shrub. Pink allamanda (Mandevilla cvs.) also has a variety of cultivars. The vine is showy with its pink, trumpet-shaped flowers blooming all year.

Don't Miss

Filter:
  • All types
  • Articles
  • Slideshows
  • Videos
Sort:
  • Most relevant
  • Most popular
  • Most recent

No articles available

No slideshows available

No videos available

By using the eHow.co.uk site, you consent to the use of cookies. For more information, please see our Cookie policy.