Types of Ash Trees

Written by brenda ingram-christian
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Types of Ash Trees
("The wet waste-paper basket / La papelera mojada" is Copyrighted by Flickr user: pasotraspaso (Jesus Solana) under the Creative Commons Attribution license.)

There are about 70 species of ash trees. Their scientific name is Genus Fraxinus. Most of them produce a small clustered flower with a green hue and little winged fruits or samaras that are produced in early spring.

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Types of Ash Trees
("The wet waste-paper basket / La papelera mojada" is Copyrighted by Flickr user: pasotraspaso (Jesus Solana) under the Creative Commons Attribution license.)

Types

The more common types of ash trees include Autumn Purple, Cimarron, Green, Blue and White Ash and the Patmore. Other types include European, Siebold of Asia and Manna Ash.

Sizes

Autumn Purple grows to nearly 70 feet tall and 30 feet wide. Cimarron, Patmore and Green Ash reach heights of up to 60 feet, spreading approximately 30 to 40 feet wide. The White Ash is the largest ash tree grown in North America, growing 50 to 80 feet tall with a spread of up to 60 feet and a trunk diameter of up to 6 feet.

Colours

Fall is the best time to see the colours of the ash trees. The Cimarron has a dark green leaf with becomes orange red to brick red and the Green and Blue Ash turns yellow. The White Ash leaves turn yellow or maroon.

Unique Attributes

The Green Ash is known for being a fast-growing tree and is used in windbreaks. Green Ash and White Ash prefer a sandy, loamy or clay soil, while the other ash trees mentioned above adapt to all soil types. The Patmore Ash is seedless. European and Siebold are valued for the cabinetry quality wood.

Common Attributes

Ash trees are valued for their timber. They are resistant to disease and resilient in northern regions where low temperatures are the norm.

Considerations

Green Ash drop their leaves quickly in the fall, so there is not much time to provide effective colour. Ash trees can have problems with canker and borers. Wild seedlings can sprout up in your flower beds from the little winged fruits that are dropped in the spring.

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