The average salary of a corporate lawyer

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The average salary of a corporate lawyer
Starting corporate attorneys earned £42,816 to £79,378 in 2009. (business woman's portrait image by Nikolay Okhitin from Fotolia.com)

Corporate lawyers handle cases that involve business and industry. The average salary of a corporate lawyer varies depending on length of employment, education level, type of employer and area of speciality.

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Least Experienced

Corporate lawyers with one to four years of work experience in the field earned annual salaries of £42,816 to £79,378 as of July 2009. The average salary range for corporate attorneys with five to nine years of experience was £61,472 to £96,185.

Most Experienced

The income of corporate lawyers with 10 to 19 years of experience in the field was £64,897 to £110,976 in July 2009.

Employer Type

In July 2009, the highest paying employers of corporate lawyers were private legal practices, where attorneys earned maximum salaries of £102,876, while hospitals were one of the lowest paying employers with salaries of £95,886.

Specialities of Law

The highest paying speciality for corporate lawyers was real estate in July 2009. Real estate attorneys averaged a maximum annual salary of £110,544. The lowest paying speciality was litigation and appeals with a maximum salary that averaged £95,444.

Education Level

In July 2009, corporate lawyers with juris doctor degrees earned the highest average maximum salaries of £100,342 to £111,716. Those with a bachelor's degree in law earned the lowest maximum salaries at £66,812.

Benefits

In July 2009, many corporate lawyers received additional benefits that increased their overall compensation packages, including 1.9 to 3.5 weeks of paid vacation time and average annual bonuses of £5,290 and £16,742.

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