How much money does a probation officer make a year?

Written by faith davies
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Probation officers monitor the progress of criminals released from prison or given reduced sentences, trying to ensure that they do not return to their past behaviour. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that the demand for probation officers will grow by 11 per cent through 2016, resulting in the creation of 10,000 jobs.

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Average Salary and Salary Range

Probation officers average an annual salary of £32,188. The lowest-paid 10 per cent of probation officers receive salaries around £19,168, while the highest-paid 10 per cent earn £50,836.

Largest and Highest-Paying Employers

Some of the largest employers of probation officers are individual and family services and facilities support services, where officers earn average salaries of £20,000 and £21,183, respectively. The highest-paying employers of probation officers are elementary and secondary schools, state and local governments, psychiatric and substance abuse hospitals, and outpatient care centres, with salaries that average between £22,243 and £33,624.

Highest-Paying Areas

The states with the highest-paid probation officers are California, New Jersey, Connecticut, Minnesota and Massachusetts, where workers receive average incomes between £32,825 and £47,833.

Education

Probation officers with bachelor's degrees in sociology earn the highest average maximum salaries at £37,360, reports PayScale.com. Those with bachelor's degrees in criminology earn the lowest maximum salaries at £26,227.

Work Experience

The average salary for probation officers with less than one year of experience is between £18,221 and £23,680, while those with 20 or more years of experience average between £27,526 and £45,490.

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