History of the blow dryer

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History of the blow dryer
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The blow dryer is a common hairstyling tool that most women cannot live without. They are made by thousands of manufacturer's world wide and come in a variety of colours and sizes. The blow dryer has come a long way from it's humble beginnings. Blow dryer's are a must have tool for modern day hairstyling.

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Alexandre F. Godefroy

A French hairstylist invented the first hair dryer in 1890. Alexandre F. Godefroy's blow dryer consisted of a bonnet that attached to the chimney pipe of a gas stove. This was the first hood dryer ever made.

1920's Blow Dryer

Hand held blow dryers were introduced in 1920. They resembled a vacuum cleaner, and some vacuum cleaners had attachments for drying the hair. The blow dryer was manufactured by the Hamilton Beach Company and the Universal Motor Company.

History of the blow dryer


By the 1930's gas powered blow dryers had been invented. They did not last long because they were too harsh on the hair. The standard hood dryer was also invented which remains the staple hair dryer in beauty salons. Original hand held dryers were extremely heavy and were made from chrome plated steel.


By the mid 1950's, newer models had silent running motors which were compact and housed inside of the fan. This allowed the blow dryer to be less noisy and bulky. The blow dryers had elegant designs and were brightly coloured. The portable case hair dryer was also invented and could be worn like a handbag over the shoulder.

Modern Day Blow Dryers

With the advances of technology modern day blow dryers are sleek and sophisticated. Modern hairdryers are made using tourmaline crystal ionic technology, or nanofusion. Tourmaline is a silicate that is believed to create shiny smooth hair. Nano technology is said to kill bacteria and viruses.

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