Recovery time for heel spur surgery

Written by genevieve van wyden
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It's uncomfortable trying to walk when your feet develop debilitating problems. After trying to address the problem with non-surgical remedies, you may have decided to have surgery for a painful heel spur. After the surgery, you still aren't home free, however. You have to stay off your foot and keep the incision site dry. After a prescribed amount of time, you're allowed back on your foot. It may seem to take a long time, but the weeks you spend resting your foot after surgery will help you get back into good health.

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Time Frame

The first week after surgery, podiatrists recommend to their patients that they stay off their feet as much as possible. Doctors encourage their patients to start walking right away but it takes three weeks to begin walking comfortably.

Function

Doctors advise their patients to stay off their feet to avoid further injury or complications to the affected foot. The surgery doesn't directly address the cause of the heel spur, so it's important to listen to and follow the surgeon's instructions.

Features

The surgery is performed to separate the plantar fascial ligament from where it is attached to the heel bone. Some surgeons prefer to remove the actual heel spur during this surgery.

Considerations

Some podiatrists prefer to have patients wear a surgical shoe or a supportive shoe to protect the foot after surgery. Sometimes the use of crutches is recommended. These options are usually made at the discretion of individual surgeons.

Warning

Disregarding the doctor's orders will cause a recurrence of the heel pain. If you are required to spend a significant part of your day standing or walking, take time from work to recover. It's also a good idea to wear orthotics in your shoes to help keep your foot in the best position possible.

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