Example of a prenuptial agreement

Written by pamela gardapee
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A prenuptial agreement can mean and say many things, but it can only deal with finances, property, debts and disputes when ending a marriage. The prenuptial cannot include any information about child custody or support, visitation or anything unfair or illegal. A good example of a prenuptial agreement includes details, while preserving the love between the two people involved.

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Property

Division and distribution of property can be set up in a prenuptial agreement. It can list all property that each person comes into the relationship with and will retain if a divorce happens. It can be used to separate community property from personal property. It can designate who is to receive the property upon either person's death. The residence can be included in the agreement.

Debts

If one or the other has debts when entering into a marriage, the agreement can protect one or the other party from being held responsible for the prior debts. The agreement can also say who will be held liable for debts incurred during the marriage.

Finances

The prenuptial agreement can state any alimony payments in the event of a divorce or who is designated as a trustee for the estate at the time of death of one or the other. The agreement can include what the responsibilities are for each partner during the marriage.

Disputes

The prenuptial agreement can designate how disputes about the agreement are handled. It can include arbitration or mediation if either of the parties decides to contest the agreement after death or during divorce.

Sunset Clause

This clause is placed in many agreements and states that if the couple is married for longer than so many years that the prenuptial is no longer valid. This part of the prenuptial is very detailed and specific to the day and year.

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