Symptoms of diverticulitis in the esophagus

Written by holly huntington
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Diverticulas are pocket-like pouches that develop on the inside walls of the digestive tract, usually in the colon or oesophagus. For those who have the condition--generally three times more in men than women (and people ranging in age from 30 to 50)--it's called diverticulosis. These pouches aren't usually a problem medically and may even go unnoticed due to a lack of symptoms. However, once two or more of these pouches become infected or inflamed, symptoms can develop and the condition is then called diverticulitis.

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Oesophagus Diverticulitis

Diverticulitis (infection or inflammation) generally occurs in one of three different locations when it's present in the oesophagus: Zenker's diverticulum (the esophageal upper neck area), traction diverticulum (esophageal mid-section) and ephiphrenic diverticulum (lower esophageal section, near the opening into the stomach from the oesophagus).

Zenker's (or Pulsion) Diverticulum Symptoms

Bad breath (halitosis) and regurgitated saliva and food are all possible symptoms of this type of upper neck esophageal diverticulitis. In addition, with this most common type of esophageal diverticulitis, throat irritation may also be experienced, as well as regurgitation during sleep.

Traction Diverticulum Symptoms

There are usually no symptoms with this type of diverticulitis.

Ephiphrenic Diverticulum Symptoms

Swallowing problems result from this type. The oesophagus may also rupture, causing the contents in the oesophagus to move into the chest and/or neck. There could even be pain experienced that mirrors that of a heart attack.

Additional Symptoms

Other symptoms might include: an internal noise when swallowing liquids, hoarseness, a chronic cough and a bad mouth taste.

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