About the values of antique treadle sewing machines

Written by emily martinez
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There are several categories for treadle sewing machines, and their values vary greatly. Antique treadle sewing machines are very popular for collectors of Singer products, and Singer offers a range of treadle machines that vary from industrial to child-sized machines. There are several ways to determine the value of an antique treadle machine, and a number of websites can help determine what the machine is worth.

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History

The history of treadle sewing machines is rich. The treadle machine is the most important machine in sewing today, and newer machines can cost thousands of dollars. Singer made the first industrialised treadle machines over 100 years ago, but the first sewing machine to ever receive a patent was a British creation given to a German business man, Charles Wiesenthal. However the patent was actually missing the plans for the machine, and only included the patent for a needle for the machine. A patent was later given to an English man named Thomas Saint, and he is credited with having made the first treadle machine.

Function

The treadle sewing machine's changed sewing forever, after thousands of years of people only sewing by hand. The industrial era in terms of sewing was established after the Englishman, Thomas Saint made his working prototype of the very first patented treadle sewing machine. After that, the business of treadle machines flourished substantially, and hand sewing was decreased.

Types

There are different types and brands of antique treadle sewing machines. The first and most successful commercially industrialised machine was created by Isaac Singer, and these early machines are the ones that are worth the most money today. Later on other companies began to copy the Singer treadle machine, causing the sewing machine industry to explode, however the only antique machines that carry a monetary value are Singer and Howe. Singer machines are the only ones that are easily found in America. Howe machines are often found, but in such poor shape that they have no value.

Identification

Identifying the value of antique treadle machines can be extremely complicated. You must first learn to identify the types of antique machines. Singer machines of all types, were always manufactured in metal. The machines were all well made and extremely durable. Singer machines were almost always black with gold lettering or designs on them. Singer machines always move up and down, whereas other machines' needles would move side to side.

Determining Value

Determining the value takes a lot of research and practice. It is best to always check antique shops, magazines, or online websites to determine if the machine is of value. The best rule of thumb is to always check for serial numbers, brand names, colour, and designs on the machine. Gather this information, and then do a general search to determine the monetary value.

Considerations

Treadle machines, in order for them to be of any value, need to be of authentic type. It has to have the right appearance, the correct needle function (straight up and down), correct colour, lettering, and serial numbers. Condition of machine isn't as important as the brand, and years of the machine. Parts are easily found for all Singer treadle machine regardless of age, which increases the monetary value.

Expert Insight

The Singer Company has information regarding all industrialised sewing machines, and can help determine the value of any Singer treadle sewing machine. There are also many different websites where you can find information helpful in determining the value of a machine, and how to refurbish Singer machines.

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