Dual action exercise bikes

Written by s.f. heron
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Dual action exercise bikes provide a workout for the whole body by incorporating arm movements with the traditional pedalling motion of a bike. Many people are adding these bikes to their own home gyms and choosing to work out at the gym on these low-impact but effective machines. Dual action exercise bikes are frequently used by physical therapists to gently work the upper back and neck muscles to strengthen them after injuries.

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Significance

An upright exercise bike is simply a stationary version of a regular bike. Your body gets a workout but you're mainly working the leg and butt areas. Dual action exercise bikes feature movable bars for arm handles to work the upper body. The arm handles work similar to a forward and back rowing motion in conjunction with the movement of the bike pedals.

Function

Using both your legs and arms during exercise helps to increase your heart rate and boost your metabolism. By allowing the user to lock the arms in place, the bike allows you to choose the intensity of your workout. Higher end exercise bikes work by magnetic resistance, allowing a smooth and quiet ride. Mid-range dual action exercise bikes work with the use of a fan. The fan (and the air passing through it) provides resistance based on how fast your arms and legs move. However, the added movement of the handles doesn't impede riding at your own pace because you still control the intensity.

Considerations

If you want to burn fat and build muscles, choosing a dual action exercise bike might just be the fit for you. Ramping up your cardio training increases your metabolism and helps your body burn fat more efficiently. Any cardio workout is great for your body, but including all the large muscle groups benefits your whole body. Rather than simply engaging in a leisurely bike rise, try varying your workouts on the exercise bike. Interval training on an exercise bike allows you to vary the intensity of your workout with periods of slower riding interspersed with periods of high-effort riding.
Cardio workout should always be performed in conjunction with a reduced calorie diet to see the most benefit. Dual action exercise bikes allow for an effective low impact workout to protect the joints while still providing enough intensity for you to feel the effects of a hard workout.

Features

Typical stationary bikes have a fixed seat and arm handles. Dual action bikes have movable handles that you can lock in place if you choose not to use that feature during your workout. The pedals will work separately from the handles. However, dual action bikes do allow you to increase the intensity of your arm workout. When unlocked, the arm handles and pedals work in conjunction. You can increase the intensity by letting your upper body do more of the work.
Seats are adjustable on dual action exercise bikes. Make sure to position the seat where you can sit comfortably with your knees bent with your feet on the pedals. Higher end dual action bikes also have added features that measure distance, speed, and resistance. Deluxe models also feature intensity level monitors, calories burnt, and pulse and heart rates to help you chart your fitness progress. Costs range from £130 to over £520 for the higher-end models. Make sure to consult the store about warranties and service contracts for maintenance.

Benefits

Dual action stationary bikes provide the best of both worlds for fitness. These bikes can be used at home for cardio training, taking up a relatively small amount of room. At a reasonable price, dual action bikes make a great addition to the home gym as an option to providing a great cardio workout. Dual action exercise bikes allow an upper body workout by repetitive push and pull motion of arm handles. The motion is typically back and forth, alternating left and right. The arms handles of the bike move in rhythm with the pedals.

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